Home » High School Course Descriptions

High School Course Descriptions

SCIENCE

Biology

The Introduction to Biology course here at Wells International School is devised to impart an extensive, comprehensive detailed look at the biological sciences.The course aims at providing a foundation across major sub disciplines of biology. It also incorporates cross cutting perspectives where students are trained to see how biology is connected to all the different sciences. Along with building a strong base in general biology, this course draws constant links to the Expected Schoolwide Learning Results (ESLRs). These can be found on Wells International School’s website.
The main areas covered are :

  • The Chemistry of Life
  • Cellular Structure and Energetics
  • Cellular Reproduction
  • Basics of Genetics
  • DNA to Proteins
  • Human Physiology
  • Ecology
  • Taxonomy

Chemistry

The General Chemistry course offered at the Wells international School  aims at introducing Chemistry to Grade 9 students. The aim of this course is to expose students to Chemistry as a central science- it’s importance in developing connections to the physical world and the biological beings. The General Chemistry course can be considered as a pre-IB chemistry course as one of it’s aim is to prepare the students to learn IB chemistry course in higher secondary classes with ease. As the topics discussed during the course are conceptual , the students who wish to appear for AP Chemistry also get familiarized and it facilitates their learning.  This curriculum is based on the U.S. based common core standards and incorporates the expected school learning results (ESLRs) which aim at preparing the students for a better university and employment life.
The course uses both the conceptual learning complemented with practical work for an easy understanding of chemistry.
The main areas of Chemistry covered in this semester course are Inorganic and Physical Chemistry.  Topics included are:

  • Structure of Atom
  • The periodic table
  • Physical properties of mixtures
  • The mole
  • Chemical bonds
  • Acids and bases
  • Chemical reactions

Physics

The Grade 10 Introduction to Physics class is designed to give students a solid foundation in the concepts related to mechanics, nuclear physics, and electrical circuits. Students will be learning how to manipulate formulas and use mathematics in physical thought experiments science as well as the analysis of our laboratories. Do not fear — Advanced calculus will not be needed. For those wishing to continue on to IB Physics, this course will solidify many necessary skills and concepts. For the others, many of the concepts have direct relations to daily life.

Topics of the course:

  1. Numbers and precision
  2. Vectors
  3. 2D Motion with/without acceleration
  4. 1D Motion with acceleration
  5. Circular motion
  6. Momentum
  7. Forces
  8. Free-fall and drag force
  9. Weight
  10. Newton’s Laws
  11. Work and Energy
  12. Power
  13. Nuclear forces
  14. Nuclear fission/fusion
  15. Radioactive decay
  16. Uses of radiation
  17. Electrical circuits

Environmental Studies

This course follows the IB Environmental Systems & Society (ESS) syllabus – a two-year interdisciplinary course combining scientific principles and societal perspectives. The disciplines are woven together to help the student better understand our role in the sustainability of societies and the natural world.
The course explores the intricate interrelationship between the environment and society, so that students can make an informed personal response to a wide range of global issues, and develop their own environmental value system. Because environmental systems do not function in isolation, we use a systems approach to help examine the deep complexities involved in the interactions with other systems to understand the costs and benefits of human activities.

IB Requirements:
This course can be counted towards either a group 4 (Sciences) or as a group 3 (Individuals and Societies) for the Standard Level (SL) component of the IB Diploma. Assessment for the IB requires a completion of two examination papers at the end of year 2 of study. In addition, students must submit an individual investigation (IA – internal assessment). See details below in Evaluation and Assessment.

AP Biology

The course consists of four main ideas that were developed by the College Board.
These themes revolve around the concepts of evolution, free energy, information and systems.
These themes are concepts illustrated throughout the course and will need to be kept in mind when studying or taking tests as well as engaging in laboratory exercises.
The content of the course is arranged around these themes according the Next Generation Science standards.
The Biology courses here at Wells International School have been specifically written to meet the high school life science requirements (HSLS) of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).
The three dimensions of the standards are integrated throughout the course:

  1. The Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs) provide the structural framework for the workbook, dividing it into four sections. Each chapter provides activities to specifically address the performance expectations arising from the DCIs.
  2. Science and Engineering Practices are supported throughout with activities to develop skills in analyzing and interpreting data, developing and using models, and constructing explanations from evidence. A supporting introductory chapter provides students with additional opportunities to practice the mathematical and inquiry- based skills required at this level.
  3. Crosscutting concepts are identified throughout, allowing students to make connections between core ideas in different topics.

IB Biology

The themes in IB biology  revolve around the concepts of evolution, free energy, information and systems.
These themes are concepts illustrated throughout the course and will need to be kept in mind when studying or taking tests as well as engaging in laboratory exercises.
The content of the course is arranged around these themes according the Next Generation Science standards.
The Biology courses here at Wells International School have been specifically written to meet the high school life science requirements (HSLS) of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). The three dimensions of the standards are integrated throughout the course:
The Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCIs) provide the structural framework for the workbook, dividing it into four sections. Each chapter provides activities to specifically address the performance expectations arising from the DCIs.
Science and Engineering Practices are supported throughout with activities to develop skills in analyzing and interpreting data, developing and using models, and constructing explanations from evidence. A supporting introductory chapter provides students with additional opportunities to practice the mathematical and inquiry- based skills required at this level.
Crosscutting concepts are identified throughout, allowing students to make connections between core ideas in different topics.
Integrated into the course are the scientific method and theory of knowledge.
The course requires 60 hours of Internal assessment activities that are required by IB.

IB Physics

IB Physics is a two year course, which follows the topics as set out by the International Baccalaureate. Further details can be accessed on the website, www.ibo.org. A 2016 IB Physics Guide will also be made available for students. In addition to the subject specific IB Physics content, this course aims to develop scientific literacy, critical-thinking skills, and problem-solving skills so that our students can better participate as knowledgeable and thinking citizens of the global community.  
Mathematical skills are important in Physics. Students who take the Higher Level Physics course are generally aiming to do a science-based major in the university. A strong understanding of trigonometry and algebra is a requisite. Completion of precalculus is strongly advised. Calculus, although not a requirement, is often taken concurrently with HL Physics. Standard Level Physics is less intensive than the Higher Level class, and many take SL Physics as an elective rather than as a requirement for the university. A strong understanding of trigonometry and algebra is still a requisite. Completion of precalculus is still strongly advised. Further math courses are not a requisite, though.
In addition to the rigorous study of Physics, the IB Physics course emphasizes hands-on experiments. HL students will spend roughly 40 hours working on investigations. They will learn to write professional lab reports with proper analysis. At the end of the second year, all students will complete an individualized internal assessment based on a design lab of their choice. This is a culmination experience for the students.
The topics of IB Physics covered over the course of two years include:

  1. Measurement and uncertainty
  2. Kinematics, forces, and energy
  3. Thermodynamics and gases
  4. Circular motion and gravitational fields
  5. Harmonic motion and waves
  6. Electricity and magnetism
  7. Nuclear physics and particle physics
  8. Power and power sources
  9. A class option of either engineering, relativity, optics, or astrophysics

IB Chemistry

Chemistry is an experimental science. It combines the academic study with the acquisition of practical and investigational skills. It can be approached as a central science as the chemical principles underpin both the physical and biological systems in which we live.
In this course offered, the students can experience an exciting development of concepts and  ideas through observation and manipulative skills. Students develop interpersonal skills, digital technology, life-enhancing skills and mathematics which is the language of science.
The IB diploma program offered at the Wells International School  includes both the theory and experiments that complement each other and make understanding of chemistry easier. The course follows standards set by International Baccalaureate as well as the ESLRs followed by Wells International School to promote learning of life skills to enable them succeed in universities as well as employment.
This course is offered at both Standard level (SL) and Higher level (HL) and therefore accommodates students who wish to study Chemistry as their major subject in higher education and those who do not.
The course requires 40 hours and 60 hours of practical work at the  at SL and the HL level respectively.

IB Environmental Systems and Societies

This course follows the IB Environmental Systems & Society (ESS) syllabus – a two-year interdisciplinary course combining scientific principles and societal perspectives. The disciplines are woven together to help the student better understand our role in the sustainability of societies and the natural world.
The course explores the intricate interrelationship between the environment and society, so that students can make an informed personal response to a wide range of global issues, and develop their own environmental value system. Because environmental systems do not function in isolation, we use a systems approach to help examine the deep complexities involved in the interactions with other systems to understand the costs and benefits of human activities.

IB Requirements:
This course can be counted towards either a group 4 (Sciences) or as a group 3 (Individuals and Societies) for the Standard Level (SL) component of the IB Diploma. Assessment for the IB requires a completion of two examination papers at the end of year 2 of study. In addition, students must submit an individual investigation (IA – internal assessment). See details below in Evaluation and Assessment.

IB Sports, Exercise, Health Science

Sports, exercise and health science (SEHS) is an experimental science course combining academic study with practical and investigative skills. SEHS explores the science underpinning physical performance and provides the opportunity to apply these principles. The course incorporates the disciplines of anatomy and physiology, biomechanics, psychology and nutrition. Students cover a range of core and option topics, and carry out practical (experimental) investigations in both laboratory and field settings. The course offers a deeper understanding of the issues related to sports, exercise and health in the 21st century and addresses the international dimension and ethics related to both the individual and global context.
Apart from being worthy of study in its own right, SEHS is good preparation for courses in higher or further education related to sports fitness and health, and serves as useful preparation for employment in sports and leisure industries

AP Environmental Science

The aim of this course is to equip students with scientific knowledge and skills necessary to identify and analyze environmental issues. The course aims at providing a foundation across major areas of environmental science. It also incorporates cross cutting perspectives where students are trained to see how environmental science is connected to all the different science disciplines. Along with building a strong base in ESS, this course draws constant links to the Expected Schoolwide Learning Results (ESLRs). These can be found on Wells International School’s website.
The intent of this course is to expose students to general background knowledge of nature, its various aspects and inherent dynamics. The key is learning to appreciate our Earth and look at our environment as a whole. Topics surrounding sustainability, global perspectives, global issues/solutions are covered during this course. All activities, researches, projects and laboratories are designed to lead students in becoming  responsible environmental scientists who can inquire in a critical and creative manner, and develop into truly global citizens.

Math

Algebra 1

In line with the Common Core State Standards, Algebra 1 is organized into units in which the main focus is on linear functions, coordinate graphing, real numbers, and two-variable equations. The students will be challenged to: (1) Develop proficiency in using algebra to solve problems in everyday life. (2) Expand his/her understanding of mathematical concepts. (3) Improve his/her logical thinking skills. (4) Gain an understanding of algebra as a study of the structure of the systems of real and complex numbers and (5) Gain an appreciation of how mathematics relates to the world of work.

Geometry

This course follows the Common CORE mathematics sequence, and is a required course for graduation.  This course is also a prerequisite for upper courses such as Algebra 2, PreCalculus, Calculus, and the IB Courses, and will also prepare the student for the SATs.
Overview:

  • Congruence
    • Experiment with transformations in the plane
    • Understand congruence in terms of rigid motions
    • Prove geometric theorems
    • Make geometric constructions
  • Similarity, Right Triangles, and Trigonometry
    • Understand similarity in terms of similarity transformations
    • Prove theorems involving similarity
    • Define trigonometric ratios and solve problems involving right triangles
    • Apply trigonometry to general triangles
  • Circles
    • Understand and apply theorems about circles
    • Find arc lengths and areas of sectors of circles
  • Expressing Geometric Properties with Equations
    • Translate between the geometric description and the equation for a conic section
    • Use coordinates to prove simple geometric theorems algebraically
  • Geometric Measurement and Dimension
    • Explain volume formulas and use them to solve problems
    • Visualize relationships between two-dimensional and three-dimensional objects
  • Modeling with Geometry
    • Apply geometric concepts in modeling situations

Algebra 2

Algebra 2 is an extension of Algebra 1 and includes different types of functions, linear equations, inequalities, expressions, probability, statistics and trigonometry.
This course is built upon the U.S common core standards and students are expected to:

  • Interpret the structure of expressions
  • Write expressions in equivalent forms to solve problems
  • Perform arithmetic operations on polynomials
  • Understand the relationship between zeros and factors of polynomials
  • Use polynomial identities to solve problems
  • Rewrite rational functions
  • Create equations that describe numbers or relationships
  • Understand solving equations as a process of reasoning and explain the reasoning
  • Solve equations and inequalities in one variable
  • Solve systems of equations
  • Represent and solve equations and inequalities graphically

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
  • Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
  • Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
  • Model with mathematics.
  • Use appropriate tools strategically.
  • Attend to precision.
  • Look for and make use of structure.
  • Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

Pre-Calculus

Pre-calculus is currently offered for grade 9-10 students as preparatory course for AP Calculus AB and IB Math. The course will 1) give students depth in essential topics that will make learning Calculus and further topics more efficient and 2) help the student focus on process and being able to explain their own work.  Content includes functions, intermediate Trigonometry, principles to proofs, complex numbers, sequence, series and recursions, and introductory Calculus topics such limits. Skill wise the course will encourage students to explore various visual applications and calculators to enhance their learning experience, and have the tools to build their own investigations.  

AP Calculus

Calculus is intended for students who have a thorough knowledge of college preparatory mathematics. The study of calculus involves three stages: the limit process, differentiation, and integration. The curriculum for this course is intended to prepare the student for the advanced placement Calculus AP Exam, which is administered in May.

AP Statistics

AP Statistics is the high school equivalent of a one semester, introductory college statistics course. In this course, students develop strategies for collecting, organizing, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data.  Students design, administer, and tabulate results from surveys and experiments. Probability and simulations aid students in constructing models for chance phenomena. Sampling distributions provide the logical structure for confidence intervals and hypothesis tests.  Students will use a TI-83/84 graphing calculator, and Web-based java applets to investigate statistical concepts. To develop effective statistical communication skills, students are required to prepare frequent written and oral analyses of real data.

IB Mathematics SL

The IB Math SL course follows a rigorous curriculum covering an array of mathematical topics. These topics include Algebra, Functions and Equations, Statistics and Probability, Circular Functions and Trigonometry, Vectors, and Calculus.
This two year course will not only prepare students for the IB Math SL exams and the Internal Assessment component, but also empower students with the necessary mathematical concepts and knowledge to transition well into university majors that require a broad and thorough mathematics background. More Info

IB Mathematics HL

The course focuses on developing an extensive array of the mathematical foundations to the extent of technicality and rigour. This is ideally fit for students pursuing engineering, medical, and science majors, but is open for anyone who is looking to incorporate a significant amount of their experience to studying mathematics. Content includes Functions, Trigonometry, Differential and Integral Calculus, Sequence and Series, Induction, Complex Numbers, Probability and Statistics, Vectors. Skill wise students will develop technological applications from more deductive problem solving and to further enhance their learning through visualization. Along with the CORE content components, an additional option topic (and exam) will be one of the following; Series and Differential Equations, Discrete Mathematics, Sets and Relations, Statistics. Also as part of the DP math courses students will submit a math style exploration of a topic of their own.

IB Math Studies/Integrated Math

The IB DP mathematical studies standard level (SL) course focuses on important interconnected mathematical topics. The syllabus focuses on: placing more emphasis on student understanding of fundamental concepts than on symbolic manipulation and complex manipulative skills; giving greater emphasis to developing students’ mathematical reasoning rather than performing routine operations; solving mathematical problems embedded in a wide range of contexts; using the calculator effectively. There is an emphasis on applications of mathematics and statistical techniques. It is designed to offer students with varied mathematical backgrounds and abilities the opportunity to learn important concepts and techniques and to gain an understanding of a wide variety of mathematical topics, preparing them to solve problems in a variety of settings, develop more sophisticated mathematical reasoning and enhance their critical thinking.

The aims of all DP mathematics courses are to enable students to:

  •         enjoy and develop an appreciation of the elegance and power of mathematics
  •         develop an understanding of the principles and nature of mathematics
  •         communicate clearly and confidently in a variety of contexts
  •         develop logical, critical and creative thinking, and patience and persistence in problem-solving
  •         employ and refine their powers of abstraction and generalization
  •         apply and transfer skills to alternative situations, to other areas of knowledge and to future developments
  •         appreciate how developments in technology and mathematics have influenced each other
  •         appreciate the moral, social and ethical implications arising from the work of  mathematicians and the applications of mathematics
  •         appreciate the international dimension in mathematics through an awareness of the  universality of mathematics and its multicultural and historical perspectives
  •         appreciate the contribution of mathematics to other disciplines, and as a particular “area of knowledge” in the TOK course.

Integrated Mathematics/Non-IB Mathematics

Integrated Mathematics/Non-IB Mathematics is a very useful, practical course, for students who are not planning on taking the IB Diploma program. The course was introduced at Wells just this year and it is proving beneficial for those students who opt not to take the IB diploma. Below is a sample structure the course could take. It is at the discretion of the teacher that will be teaching the course to try an alternative syllabus.

The Integrated Mathematics/Non-IB Mathematics course, for the 2017-2018 academic year, consisted of 2 main sections, selected from a total of 5 sections, and are highlighted in bold below.

  • Prerequisite topics
    • Linear Equations and Inequalities
    • Functions
    • Exponential functions
  • Area and Volume

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

G9 English LA

Grade 9 ELA is a standard level course meant to cover all aspects of the Grade 9 curriculum.
The critical thinking and work standard expectations are set at the appropriate level using the American ‘Common Core’, and includes the reading and analysis of a wide range of texts including literature (reading novels, short stories, poems, etc) and non-fiction (essays, speeches, etc). The course also contains components such as an introduction to rhetorical analysis designed to prepare students for Grade 10.

G9 English LA Honors

Grade 9 ELA Honors is a course meant to cover all aspects of the Grade 9 curriculum, including literature (reading novels, short stories, poems, etc) as well as non-fiction (essays, speeches, etc). The critical thinking and work standard expectations are higher than the standard Grade 9 course; the course is designed to challenge students at a higher level. The course also contains components designed to prepare students for AP English Language and Composition in Grade 10.

G10 English LA

Grade 10 English Language Arts is a standard level course that adheres to the teaching of the American ‘Common Core State Standards’ (CCSS). The course also serves as a foundation for the 3 IB courses on offer to students from grade 11. No matter whether students take the full IB DP program, IB subject certification, or the Wells International School Diploma, their Grade 11 and 12 English Language Arts classes will be in the form of a two-year International Baccalaureate (IB) course. 3 such courses are currently on offer at Wells International school: IB LL (Language and Literature) SL (standard level), IB LL HL (higher level), and Literature and Performance SL.
The 10th grade ELA curriculum continues the development of the core skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The class activities and projects are designed to help students master the skills needed to meet the state standards as well as enabling them to be successful life-long learners. We cover approximately one unit per month. Each unit has an assigned webpage on my website that gives an outline of the work that will be covered. From there students can find out what we will be learning in the weeks ahead, and review all the learning objectives in preparation for all your assessments. We read some fantastic literature, build upon students’ Language Arts skills, and have exciting discussions.
The course is both rigorous and challenging, but ultimately enriching. We explore both literary and non-literary texts and their contexts. We discover how different audiences react, interact and interpret a variety of texts. To this end, we analyse and learn to appreciate a range of texts, including dramatic scripts/plays, novels, and nonfiction articles, essays, letters, and speeches.

G10 AP English Language and Composition

AP English Language and Composition is designed as a university-level, rhetoric-based course; non-fiction including speeches, essays, and primary source analysis is emphasised, with literature playing only a small role. The course focuses on analysis and writing, with writing emphasizing analytical essays, synthesis of information essays, and argumentative essays. The AP exams in May of each year may be used to gain university credit (at some US universities), but are not tied to the school’s GPA.
While the course is open to anyone, the course is quite strenuous in terms of writing workload and critical thinking. Priority to course admittance is given to Grade 9 honors students, but the course is open to all upon instructor recommendation.

IB Language and Literature

No matter whether students take the IB DP program, IB subject certification, or the Wells International School Diploma, their Grade 11 and 12 English Language Arts classes will be in the form of a two-year International Baccalaureate (IB) course. 3 such courses are currently on offer at Wells International school: IB LL (Language and Literature) SL (standard level), IB LL HL (higher level), and Literature and Performance SL. The IB LL courses are organised into four parts and spread over 2 years. In general terms, Parts 1 and 2 focus on non-literary texts, and Parts 3 and 4 focus on Literature. Together, the four parts of the course allow students to explore the use of the English language within its cultural context, and within all its media forms and functions. Over the course, students develop their skills of literary and textual analysis, and their ability to present their ideas effectively. A key aim is the development of critical literacy.
The IB Lang Lit HL course is both rigorous and challenging, but ultimately enriching. We explore both literary and non-literary texts and their contexts. We discover how different audiences react, interact, and interpret a variety of texts. To this end, we learn to appreciate and analyse a wide range of texts including dramatic scripts/plays, novels, nonfiction articles, advertising, and many more.

IB Literature and Performance

The purpose of this course is to analyze literature (including novels, poetry, and other fiction), and then to transform it into stage productions. The course is a hybrid of literature and theatre, and as such requires multiple skillsets and groups of terminology. Students in this course can expect to write several analysis and reflective essays, perform at least one major production on stage per semester, and generally improve on analytical, writing, and public speaking/confidence skills.
This course can count as either a Group 1 (language) or Group 6 (arts) course in the IB diploma programme, or may be used for an individual certificate; regardless, it counts as a school English Language Arts requirement for grades 11 and 12 (IB year 1 and 2).

IB English Language B

The course comprises five topics: three from the core and two chosen from the five options. At least two aspects must be covered in each of the five topics that make up the course. Additionally, at HL students must read two works of literature. The core and the options at both levels, as well as literature at HL, must be studied within the context of the culture(s) of the target language.
There are three topics in the core which is compulsory at SL and HL. Students are required to study at least two aspects from each core topic. These include:

  • Communication and media
  • Global issues
  • Social relationships

There are five topics in the options of which teachers select two. These include:

  • Cultural diversity
  • Customs and traditions
  • Health
  • Leisure
  • Science and technology

Language acquisition will be achieved through the development of the receptive, productive and interactive skills and competencies that can be accomplished through a variety of activities in oral and/or written forms. However, a student learning a language in an IB programme should not be merely absorbing grammatical or linguistic rules. In addition, students will study about a culture when studying its language. Accordingly, the language B course will give as much attention to the sociocultural components of a language as to the teaching of communicative skills and linguistic components.

SOCIAL STUDIES

G9 Modern World History

This course covers modern world history from the 19th century to the present. We will begin by exploring the Age of Imperialism and the impact of colonialism on both the colonizers and the colonized. Students will understand how these events transformed the world and led to the rise of nationalist movements, isolationism, revolutions, and global conflicts. We will explore the long term and immediate causes and consequences of both world wars and how these wars shaped the world we live in today. Students will think critically in analyzing whether or not such violence is justified and whether or not such conflicts can be avoided in the future. The course will shift to more recent history such as the Cold War and explore how the power struggle between nations and ideologies continues to affect our world today. The aim of this course is to give students a better understanding of the present day world and enable them to make direct connections between the past and the present.

G10 Intro to Business Management and Economics

This course provides an introduction and comprehensive overview of business activity, the business environment, business organization, marketing, human needs and rewards, organizational leadership, the economic environment, and financing business activity. Learners will engage in meaningful analysis and discussion of contemporary business and economic trends and issues in order to deal with real world case scenarios in written and oral responses. They will make effective use of relevant terminology, concepts and methods so that they can relate the theory and knowledge of business studies to critically solve a wide range of real world business challenges. By studying organizations in depth, and by developing their own business initiatives, they will be equipped to play a functional role in the marketplace and will ideally be introduced to concepts that will appear in IB Business Management and IB Economics.

G10 Intro to Psychology

The Introduction to Psychology course is a one semester exploration into the world of social sciences. The course begins with an overview of how psychology developed in Prehistoric Europe to modern practice. Students are given a comprehensive understanding of how the science of psychology and behavior, develops over time citing well known theorist as Freud, to groundbreaking researchers such as Piaget. The students begin to understand how psychology developed as an academic discipline, then learning a variety of principal methodologies to form a holistic view of the content. The classes are arranged to understand broad areas of research and theoretical principles through in-class experiments, school-wide observation, data collection and personal reflection. The hope for the Introduction to Psychology course is to build interest in registering for IB Psychology in Grade 11.

AP World History

This is NOT a normal high school history class that you have taken before; it is a college-level class, i.e., equivalent to a first-year university course.  APWH (Advanced Placement World History) will require you to be a critical thinker and independent learner who—in addition to learning the content of the course based around the five themes of APWH—can learn utilize historical thinking skills to apply what you have learned to pass the APWH exam in May.  You will need to consult with the teacher of this class before officially signing up for this class.

Please see the official College Board course overview for AP World History by clicking here.

IB Business Management

“Business management is a rigorous, challenging and dynamic discipline in the individuals and societies subject group. The role of businesses, as distinct from other organizations and actors in a society, is to produce and sell goods and services that meet human needs and wants by organizing resources. Profit making, risk-taking and operating in a competitive environment characterize most business organizations. Although business management shares many skills and areas of knowledge with other humanities and social sciences, it is distinct in a number of ways. For example, business management is the study of decision making within an organization, whereas economics is the study of scarcity and resource allocation, both on micro and macro levels.” 

To read more from the IB Business Management subject guide, please click here.

IB Economics

“Economics is a dynamic social science, forming part of group 3—individuals and societies. The study of economics is essentially about dealing with scarcity, resource allocation and the methods and processes by which choices are made in the satisfaction of human wants. As a social science, economics uses scientific methodologies that include quantitative and qualitative elements. The IB Diploma Programme economics course emphasizes the economic theories of microeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting individuals, firms and markets, and the economic theories of macroeconomics, which deal with economic variables affecting countries, governments and societies. These economic theories are not to be studied in a vacuum—rather, they are to be applied to real-world issues. Prominent among these issues are fluctuations in economic activity, international trade, economic development and environmental sustainability. The ethical dimensions involved in the application of economic theories and policies permeate throughout the economics course as students are required to consider and reflect on human end-goals and values. The economics course encourages students to develop international perspectives, fosters a concern for global issues, and raises students’ awareness of their own responsibilities at a local, national and international level. The course also seeks to develop values and attitudes that will enable students to achieve a degree of personal commitment in trying to resolve these issues, appreciating our shared responsibility as citizens of an increasingly interdependent world.”

To read more from the IB Economics subject guide, please click here.

IB Psychology

“The IB Diploma Programme psychology course is the systematic study of behaviour and mental processes.  The course examines the interaction of biological, cognitive and sociocultural influences on human behaviour. Students undertaking the course can expect to develop an understanding of how psychological knowledge is generated, developed and applied.  This will allow them to have a deeper understanding of the nature and scope of psychology, as well as a greater understanding of themselves and appreciation for the diversity of human behaviour.

The course is designed to allow for in-depth analysis, evaluation and consolidation of learning. The holistic approach reflected in the curriculum, which sees biological, cognitive and sociocultural analysis being taught in an integrated way ensures that students are able to develop an understanding of what all humans share, as well as the immense diversity of influences on human behaviour and mental processes.  Students will be encouraged to make comparisons and evaluate different psychological theories and arguments. The ethical concerns raised by the methodology and application of psychological research are also key considerations of the IB psychology course.

To continue reading from the IB Psychology subject guide, please click here.

IB Environmental Systems and Society

This course follows the IB Environmental Systems & Society (ESS) syllabus – a two-year interdisciplinary course combining scientific principles and societal perspectives. The disciplines are woven together to help the student better understand our role in the sustainability of societies and the natural world.

The course explores the intricate interrelationship between the environment and society, so that students can make an informed personal response to a wide range of global issues, and develop their own environmental value system. Because environmental systems do not function in isolation, we use a systems approach to help examine the deep complexities involved in the interactions with other systems to understand the costs and benefits of human activities.

G12 Issues in Society

“Issues in Society” will be YOUR course and those teaching it will be there to help guide your efforts as well as assess you through clear rubrics you can find in the syllabus and on the Google Site.  You and your classmates will discover, discuss and debate what is going on in your immediate environment and in other countries around the world. Through discussion and brainstorming, you will also try to come up with possible solutions to deal with the problems in the world.  You will also be given the opportunity to plan and perform community service.

The teachers will generally only be facilitators and fellow participant who will work with you to craft a university-style research essay and quality oral presentation with an accompanying Google Slide Presentation.  Basically, you and your classmates will examine different social issues in Thailand and around the world and then use the UN’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) as a standard for judging various “issues” (i.e., important topics or problems for debate or discussion) in society.  This will be a student-driven course where you get to decide what you will research and present to others.

Here is the overarching question that drives the course:  As a global citizen who is internationally minded and a lifelong learner, what can I do to make the world a better place?

COMPUTER SCIENCE

G9 ICT & Computer Science

The students will be introduced to basic programmings skills using SCRATCH and Small Basic. ( iteration, conditional statements and structured programmings ) this will help with students thinking logically and problem solving). Students will also acquire basic networking skills and an understanding of how the internet works.
Within ICT, students will acquire knowledge through the activities based on graphics, multimedia(image and video) editing tools. Most of the activities are project based work.

AP Computer Science

Please see the official College Board course overview for AP Computer Science Principles (APCSP) by clicking here.

IB Computer Science

For a course overview of the Computer Science IB course please click on course description
For a more details overview please browse my IB specific web site click here
A small part of the course covers logical thinking skills and this is taught through programming (PHP and Java Script). Please note this only one section and  no prior knowledge of programming is required.

Publications

Students will learn page design, advanced publishing techniques, copy writing, editing and photography while producing a creative, innovative yearbook which records school memories and events.

CHINESE

Chinese Level 1-8

The Chinese course has 8 books (level 1 to level 8), the goal of this series of books is to help the students establish a solid foundation of vocabulary, knowledge of Chinese and communication skills through the natural and gradual integration of language, content and cultural elements. This series adopts a holistic approach, and is designed to emphasize the development of communication skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing.

IB Chinese Ab Initio

IB Chinese ab initio is designed to provide students with the necessary skills and intercultural understanding to enable them to communicate successfully in an environment where the language studied is spoken. This course is organized into three themes (Individual and society, Leisure and work, Urban and rural environment). Each theme has a list of topics that provide the students with opportunities to practice and explore the language as well as to develop intercultural understanding. Through the development of receptive, productive and interactive skills, students should be able to respond and interact appropriately in a defined range of everyday situations. Language ab initio is available at SL only.

IB Chinese B

The course exposes students to a range of 8 topics (see below) and enhances students’ language proficiency through receptive, productive and interactive assessments. The ultimate goal is to help students use Chinese in real-life situations and help them broaden their world view by comparing Chinese cultural products, practices and perspectives with those of their own country. 8 topics of Chinese B SL/HL: Communication and media, Global issues, Social relationships, Cultural diversity, Customs and traditions, Health, Leisure, Science and technology.

SPANISH

Intro to Spanish Culture and Language Description

This course is designed to give the student a basic understanding of the Spanish language through reading, writing, listening and speaking activities as well as in-depth look at the culture and traditions of Spanish speaking countries around the globe. The course is broken up into thematic units focusing on concepts that build the student’s knowledge of basic, day-to-day functions using the Spanish language.

IB Spanish ab initio SL

The IB DP language ab initio course is designed to provide students with the necessary skills and intercultural understanding to enable them to communicate successfully in an environment where the language studied is spoken. This process encourages the learner to go beyond the confines of the classroom, expanding an awareness of the world and fostering respect for cultural diversity. The language ab initio course develops students’ linguistic abilities through the development of receptive, productive and interactive skills by providing them opportunities to respond and interact appropriately in a defined range of everyday situations. Language ab initio is available at standard level only.

The aims of the language ab initio course are to:

  • develop students’ intercultural understanding
  • enable students to understand and use the language they have studied in a range of contexts and for a variety of purposes
  • encourage, through the study of texts and through social interaction, an awareness and appreciation of the different perspectives of people from other cultures
  • develop students’ awareness of the role of language in relation to other areas of knowledge
  • develop students’ awareness of the relationship between the languages and cultures with which they are familiar
  • provide students with a basis for further study, work and leisure through the use of an additional language
  • provide the opportunity for enjoyment, creativity and intellectual stimulation through knowledge of an additional language.

To read more, please click on course description

THAI

Grade 9-10 Thai (Pre – IB Program)

In the Pre IB (Grade 9 – 10) program Thai A: language and literature provides a balance between language and literature where students develop an appreciation of the nature, power and beauty of language and literature, and of the many influences on language and literature globally. Language A courses develop linguistic and literary understanding and skills through the study of a broad range of genres and world literature, as well as language learning in context. The study of one or more languages A enables students to work towards their full linguistic potential. Gaining an understanding that language and literature are creative processes encourages the development of imagination and creativity through self-expression.

Grade 9-10 THAI for Non-Native Thai

The goal of the Thai Language and Culture Programme for non-Thai speaking students is to enable them to communicate in Thai appropriately to cultivate an understanding of, and to have good attitude toward, Thai culture. Students are expected to conduct themselves appropriately in Thai society, and show appreciation of and respect for cultural diversity.
The Thai language course for non-Thai speaking students is competency-based. The course is designed to help students to acquire a wide range of sufficient vocabulary and to develop practical language skills relevant to the students’ daily lives. The course is conducted from Level 1 – Level 5, including early beginning, beginning, early intermediate, intermediate and advanced levels, depending on the individual student’s language background and ability. The main emphasis of the programme is on conversational Thai. As the students advance through the course, a greater emphasis is placed on Thai basic literacy and grammar.
Active participation is encouraged to acquire fluency in conversation. Thai cultural aspects are promoted and integrated in the language lessons. English or the school primary language can be used as the medium of instruction.

THAI A: Language and Literature Diploma Program

The Diploma Program language A: language and literature course is designed to support future academic study by developing a high social, aesthetic and cultural literacy, as well as effective communication skills. While there is significant difference in the texts presented for study in the three courses, they will clearly overlap somewhat. There is no aim for each course to define completely separate territory. Instead, the main difference lies in the different areas of focus each takes. In the language A: literature course, focus is directed towards developing an understanding of the techniques involved in literary criticism and promoting the ability to form independent literary judgments. The focus of the language A: language and literature course is directed towards developing and understanding the constructed nature of meanings generated by language and the function of context in this process. Literature and performance allows students to combine literary analysis with the investigation of the role of performance in our understanding of dramatic literature.

Facebook

Youtube